January 2017

Happy 2017, and welcome to the new Little Green Teapot. I’m in a steady place with my mental health meaning that I’m less reliant on my mental health blog, but I want to continue to write regularly and as a self-confessed bibliophile, my first thought was books!

So far this year, I’ve read five books. I’m trying to coin the word ‘bookdate’ like a ‘book update’ but I won’t quit my day job… Anyway, here’s the list:

  • Peter Pan by J.M.Barrie
  • Animal: The Autobiography of a Female Body by Sara Pascoe
  • When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
  • Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur
  • The Doll Funeral by Kate Hamer

Let’s dive straight in shall we?


Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

“To die will be an awfully big adventure.”

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I’ve been a long-time lover of the story of Peter Pan. Every year when I was little, for World Book Day I would dress up as Peter Pan and wish so hard that I could fly and live in an underground tree house. And yet, I’d never actually read the full J.M. Barrie novel. I’m quite ashamed, I admit it.

Well, it’s safe to say I’m glad I finally have. It was stunning. It filled me up with childish glee and I was transported to mermaid lagoon to be with my friends. I adored the way J.M. Barrie would add little personal touches to the story, a style that I wish to replicate in the book I’m writing for my little niece.

The starkest thing I realised was that, actually, Peter Pan is a bit of a meany. I don’t think this is a secret to most people who know the story, but I clearly had rose-tinted glasses on from my childhood. Even so, the story will live inside me still and I will be forever grateful to Mr Barrie for bringing this story to life.

 

Animal: The Autobiography of the Female Body by Sara Pascoe

“So you’re unique and unusual, well done, now pop off and eat your banana.”

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

This book is the sex education you never had. I loved it. I’m quite ashamed at how much I learnt… I can’t believe how much I didn’t know about my own body and sexuality, it’s a travesty of the modern world. Also, why on earth do I know more about a penis than a vagina? BECAUSE PATRIARCHY.

I listened to the audiobook of this which was exceptional. I always try to listen to books that are read by the author, and Sara Pascoe delivered. It was funny, educational and insightful. I really want to be her best friend.

I’ve dedicated myself to supplying all my young relations (not just girls) with this book until the government sorts out their shit and makes sex & relationship education compulsory for kids. All women out there; read this.

 

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

“We are never so wise as when we live in this moment.”

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I’m very confused by death, which is why I chose this book. It really baffles me that, in one moment, someone is gone forever. I was fascinated by his voice, and the reality of it all made this book feel so special.

I try to stay grounded in the now, especially seen as it’s crucial in order to manage my mental health, but it can be difficult. At the end of the day, you and this moment are all you have – and Paul re-affirmed this in me.

I believe that everyone should consider the philosophy of death. If reading this book is the way you do that, then I approve.

 

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

if you were born with
the weakness to fall
you were born with
the strength to rise

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

This was my first real venture into poetry, and it was a fantastic one. The power of words never fails to surprise me. The first part of the book really resonated with me because of my own personal experiences with my father. I would be filled with tears on the train to and from work, not because of sadness, but because of the relief I felt when I was reminded that I wasn’t alone. Rupi is a genius.

I can only hope to ever be able to control words like Rupi does. Not only that, but her honesty is raw and hard hitting. I felt emotionally maturer after reading Milk and Honey, and she’s blown any reservations I had about poetry far, far away.

 

The Doll Funeral by Kate Hamer

“We are what our families have made us. But sometimes you can escape that. You can close a door on it and walk into another room. This room is furnished differently. It’s all the things you choose yourself.”

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I won this book in a Twitter competition and I am very glad I did. I confess, I didn’t know anything about it when I won it, I was just drawn in by the idea of a free book (I know, I’m a sucker). I put it ahead on my to-do list because I had the chance to read it before a lot of people, so I opened it up instead of plodding along with Sense and Sensibility (sorry Austen fans).

What was special about this book was that it breathed life. Despite the main character being able to see dead people… Ruby was real to me. I was praying for everything she wanted to happen, but alas, that is not what good writing is. I couldn’t put it down once I passed the half-way point, and I raced through the last 50 pages. Everything in the story felt perfectly weaved together.

There was just something about this story. I loved being swept up in it; a surefire solid fiction.


Who knows what I’ll be reading this month? My to-read shelf is fairly full at the moment, and I’m supposively still reading Sense and Sensibility… But whatever books fall on my lap, I’ll report my thoughts and feelings back here. You can also keep up to date with where I’m escaping to on my Goodreads profile, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook Page.

Happy reading. 💕📚

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